An unusually old and beautiful prosthetic arm. It is even spring-loaded and allows wrist rotation and motion. What a beauty!

Source:
http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/objects/display.aspx?id=5936

Images:
http://i.imgur.com/uQ3M2t5.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/NYKbHf9.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/deJtMH6.jpg

An amazing initiative of Mick Ebeling who went to South Sudan, took his 3D printer with him, and is now bringing hope to all the 50.000-plus amputees that live there. Amazing project.

Link to article in the Guardian

Link to official project-page

A knitted prosthesis is a creative project by Frank Naus. There is no other information, it’s just a nice idea.

http://metropolism.com/features/graduation-fever-4/resources/P1030875.JPG?version=25df35de87aa441b88f22a6c2a830a17

This award-winning lower-leg prosthesis, created by Bob Giesberts at the University of Twente, the Netherlands, is specifically designed to be produceable in a mobile workshop. The design is inspired by the ZIP prosthesis and is co-created with several parties both in the Netherlands and Indonesia. It can be produced within 2 hours, and does not require any heavy machinery, making it ideal for mobile workshops. It is created by wrapping synthetic cast tape around the stump, which is subsequently pressed into place using a water-pressure system, thereby ensuring equal distribution of force on the stump.

Link to manual: http://www.patchproject.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/UTReport-1.0.pdf

The quality and durability of the prosthesis are currently being tested by the DARE Foundation in Jakarta, Indonesia

Solution name: Pontas
Inventor: Bob Giesberts
Country code: NL
License: Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

Picture adopted from: http://www.patchproject.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/UTReport-1.0.pdf

In the David Werner collection some of the most basic assistive solutions to hand-amputations are described. In case no other resources are available these are the bare-essentials. The manual describes how to create simple tools to hold objects like spoons or pencils. It also shows examples of grabbing hands, but sadly does not explain complete production.

Link to manual: http://www.dinf.ne.jp/doc/english/global/david/dwe002/dwe00229.html#part1chap27

Additional information: The David Werner collection contains many more tips and trick for creating easy assistance to children in places with minimum resources. The entire David Werner collection is found here:
http://www.dinf.ne.jp/doc/english/global/david/dwe002/dwe00201.html

Solution name: unknown
Inventor: David Werner
Country code: USA
License: unknown

Pictures adopted from: http://www.dinf.ne.jp/doc/english/global/david/dwe002/dwe00238.html#330

MUKTI, active since 1986, is a social organisation dedicated to helping physically challenged people. Their goal is to provide free artificial upper and lower limbs and calibers to all amputees and polio victims that are seeking help. They achieve this by setting up prosthetic camps and providing training in a wide variety of countries, mostly India, Srilanka, Bangladesh. Amputees from rural and semi urban areas who report to Mukti to get the free artificial limbs can also benefit from the free boarding and lodging facilities offered by Mukti.

Website: http://www.muktiindia.org/

Solution: Unknown

Locations: India, Srilanka, Bangladesh
(Trainings have been given in Nepal, Venezuela, Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico, Moscow, Guatemala, West Indies, Malawi, Ghana and Nigeria.)

Using patient feedback, and with a focus on disabled people living with a budget below $4 a day, the organisation D-Rev has created a affordable knee joint, that doesn’t only work, but also looks great. The ReMotion Knee, D-Rev’s first product, is the result of a collaboration between India’s Jaipur Foot and Stanford University. Through a no-cost license with Jaipur Foot the knee has now been fitted to over 4000 patients.

Original article: http://www.fastcoexist.com/1681952/a-cheap-prosthetic-knee-for-the-developing-world-designed-from-patient-feedback

Picture adopted from:http://www.fastcoexist.com/1681952/a-cheap-prosthetic-knee-for-the-developing-world-designed-from-patient-feedback

The Cambodia Trust is a company that focuses on enable people with disabilities to participate in the life of the community.  Their activities include qualifying prosthetic and orthotic graduates, providing custom made prostheses, and assisting small business set-ups.

Website:  http://www.cambodiatrust.org.uk/

Solution: So far we have not been able to find out which type of prosthesis the Cambodia Trust uses.

Areas of activity: Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Philippines, Myanmar

 

With 3-D printers a new way of creating something was born. Paul McCarthy used the awesome technology of 3-D printers and created a hand prosthesis for his son Leon. Leon was born without fingers on his left hand. On the internet Paul found out that 3-D printers allow to create new things without making a prototype or other big researches. Inspired by the design from Ivan Owen, Paul made his son a “robohand”. The 2000$ for the 3-D printer and 10$ for materials were really worth it. Leon has now a functioning hand which allows him to pick up things and uses his hands more. This procedure saved the family a lot of money and it is a new way of creating prostheses on a smaller budget. Everybody can now provide self-made prostheses designs which can be made with 3-D-Modelling programs.

Original article: http://www.iflscience.com/technology/man-makes-3d-printed-prosthetic-hand-son-only-10


image by John Cummings [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Liliane Fonds fights to improve the quality of life of children and adolescents with a handicap in developing countries, and making sure that they are able to function in society when they are older. In order to do this the Liliane Fonds works together with 2300 local mediators, amongst which; nurses, physiotherapists and doctors. For the rehabilitation the Lilian Fonds always tries to use as much local resources as possible, as close to the child as possible.

Website: www.lilianefonds.nl

Solution: The Liliane Fonds work together with local prosthetists and various types of prostheses.

Locations: The Liliane Fonds is represented in 27 different countries. Underneath there is a link to their locations.
http://2011.jaarverslaglilianefonds.nl/landenoverzicht/cDU662_Landenoverzicht.aspx